Writing Classes

I regularly teach multi-week courses in nonfiction, with a focus on memoir and the essay, at GrubStreet

Some courses I've recently taught are Master Memoir, Memoir in Progress and Master Narrative Personal Essay. Generally running 10-12 weeks, these courses are designed to sharpen and deepen writers' narratives and their sense of the genre's possibilities through careful reading of published work, craft discussions, generative exercises and honest but supportive group workshops.

Occasionally I teach single-day seminars on more specific themes and craft topics, like Imaginative License in Creative Nonfiction, Writing Provocative Stories, The Generous Opinion Piece or The Politics of Food.  

 
The intrepid writers of Memoir in Progress, Spring 2016 (background), celebrating our final class with baked goods (foreground).   Photo credit: Shellie Rapson James

The intrepid writers of Memoir in Progress, Spring 2016 (background), celebrating our final class with baked goods (foreground).

Photo credit: Shellie Rapson James

Upcoming Classes

Overstory and Understory: Layering Meaning, Friday, September 6th, 10:30am-1:30pm, GrubStreet HQ

The Writing Cycle: Generate, Critique, Revise, 10 Thursdays starting October 3rd, 6-9pm, GrubStreet HQ

 

Student Feedback

"Excellent readings, very useful education in the craft, supportive but also critical feedback. I also felt nurtured and motivated by the email message each week reminding us of the assignment. And Dorian's full page critique of each essay was impressive and very useful. He really cares." - Anonymous student from "Going Deep," Arlington Community Ed.

"Dorian is an excellent instructor, who provides insightful and detailed feedback. He offers thought-provoking questions that stimulate class discussion and create an engaging classroom environment." - Jinna Halperin, Arlington, MA

A pensive moment while discussing personal essays at Arlington High. I promise I'm not always so serious.   Photo credit: Suzanne Carter

A pensive moment while discussing personal essays at Arlington High. I promise I'm not always so serious.

Photo credit: Suzanne Carter